Report claims NC hospital nurses refused to report child sexual abuse to DSS

MONROE, N.C. (WBTV) – A report obtained by CBS North Carolina’s Charlotte affiliate WBTV shows the nursing staff on duty at CMC-Union Hospital one night in November 2016 refused to call DSS after a child disclosed facts that implicated sexual abuse.

The report was filled out by James Jackson, who was working at the hospital as a security guard.

According to the report, the nurse in charge of caring for the young male patient refused to report the boy’s allegations of possible sexual abuse.

news-app-download-apple-350x50news-app-download-android-350x50

“I told his nurse about it and she said that she would not believe anything that he says because of his history at the hospital,” Jackson wrote in his report.

State law requires anyone aware of possible child abuse to report it to social services.

Jackson wrote in his report filed at the time of the incident that he called the nursing supervisor and, later, the charge nurse about reporting the boy’s allegations of sexual abuse but both of them declined to take action, too.

Ultimately, Jackson reported the boy’s allegations to Union County DSS himself and the agency opened an investigation into the claims.

“From what I can understand from being here, it’s not the first time this has happened,” Jackson said. “But this is the time it happened with me on duty and I couldn’t let that go. I couldn’t let it go that a child is being sexually abused like that and no one do anything about it.”

Jackson told WBTV that he tried to file a complaint with the North Carolina Board of Nursing but was told by a board staff member that it was having problems investigating his complaint because the hospital would not return phone calls.

Carolinas HealthCare System refused multiple requests for an interview but issued the following statement:

“Carolinas HealthCare System policy, in accordance with North Carolina statutes, requires that all cases of suspected child abuse or neglect be reported to Department of Social Services (DSS). Calls to DSS are initiated by any CHS employee who identifies potential abuse or neglect.

We take all reports of abuse and neglect seriously and work closely with DSS and other governing authorities when the situation warrants. Every day, our doctors, nurses and teammates care for vulnerable patients and advocate for children who are victims of abuse and neglect. Elevating hope and advancing healing is not just part of our mission, it is integral to who we are as a healthcare system.”

While we cannot discuss the specifics of this case due to patient and employee privacy laws, we can say that after reviewing this issue, we do not believe the version of events represented accurately reflects what occurred. We are dedicated to the health and well-being of all patients in our care and will continue to cooperate with the proper authorities and assist with any inquiries that may arise.”

A spokeswoman for the hospital did not provide any additional facts to support the assertion that Jackson’s account of what happened – as documented in his report filed at the time of the incident – was incorrect. The hospital also did not elaborate on what, specifically, it felt was inaccurate.

Jackson ultimately left his job as a security guard at the hospital after, he said, he received growing pressure as a result of blowing the whistle on what happened. But he said he would do it again.

“We must report this. I couldn’t understand why they wouldn’t do it,” he said. “I don’t ever want to see another child go through this here or anywhere else.”

Copyright 2017 WBTV. All rights reserved.

...[READ MORE]   Source:¬†WNCN Durham County News